200-125 300-115 200-105 200-310 640-911 300-075 300-320 300-360 642-998 QV_DEVELOPER_01 400-101 700-501 117-201 70-696 700-505 600-199 400-351 300-207 TE0-141 100-105 300-101 300-206 300-070 70-417 210-260 210-060 200-355 300-208 CISSP 300-135 210-065 300-209 70-243 70-480 CCA-500 2V0-621D 210-451 400-051 E05-001 1Z0-052 70-410 640-916 VMCE_V9 810-403 070-464 070-243 700-802 70-246 FCBA GPHR DEV-401 C2090-610 SY0-401 712-50 ADM-201 700-039 312-50 MA0-101 648-244 SK0-004 ASF 70-494 70-673 500-005 1Z0-060 C9560-503 640-875 N10-006 98-367 70-534 NS0-505 70-342 CHFP 070-410 640-878 1V0-603 1Z0-804 C8010-250 312-50V9 C2150-508 98-368 CLOUDF 70-411 70-461 220-901 70-488 070-341 PK0-003 E20-547 70-412 70-686 500-285 CISM 101-400 102-400 PDM_2002001060 JN0-100 642-883 CAP 070-347 Attractions
Attractions
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The rolling hills of Burren are composed of limestone pavements with criss-crossing cracks known as "grikes", leaving isolated rocks called "clints". The region supports Arctic, Mediterranean and Alpine plants side-by-side, due to the unusual environment. The limestones, which date from the Visean stage of the Lower Carboniferous, formed as sediments in a tropical sea approximately 350 million years ago. The strata contain fossil corals, crinoids, sea urchins and ammonites. Glaciation during the Quaternary period facilitated greater denudation. The result is that the Burren is one of the finest examples of a glacio-karst landscape in the world. The effects of the last glacial period (the Midlandian) are most in evidence, with the Burren overrun by ice during this glaciation. The impact of earlier karstification has been eliminated by the last glacial period. So any surface karstification now seen dates from approximately 10,000 years ago. The Burren karst landscape is thus recent. Solutional processes have widened and deepened the grikes of the limestone pavement. Pre-existing lines of weakness in the rock contribute to the formation of extensive fissures separated by clints (flat pavement like slabs). The rock karstification facilitates the formation of subterranean drainage. In between the cracks in the rock however, 75% of Ireland's flower species grow and thrive.
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The Cliffs of Moher are located at the southwestern edge of the Burren region in County Clare, Ireland. They rise 120 metres (390 ft) above the Atlantic Ocean at Hag's Head, and reach their maximum height of 214 metres (702 ft) just north of O'Brien's Tower, eight kilometres to the north. The tower is a round stone tower near the midpoint of the cliffs built in 1835 by Sir Cornelius O'Brien. From the top of the cliffs and from O'Brien's Tower, visitors have spectacular views of the Aran Islands in Galway Bay; the Maumturks and Twelve Pins mountain ranges to the north in County Galway; and Loop Head to the south. The cliffs take their name from an old fort called Moher that once stood on Hag's Head, the southernmost point of the cliffs. The writer Thomas Johnson Westropp referred to it in 1905 as Moher Uí Ruis or Moher Uí Ruidhin. The fort still stood in 1780 and is mentioned in an account from John Lloyd's 'A Short Tour Of Clare' (1780). It was demolished in 1808 to provide material for a new telegraph tower. The present tower near the site of the old Moher Uí Ruidhin was built as a lookout tower during the Napoleonic wars. The cliffs rank amongst the top visited tourist sites in Ireland, and receive almost one million visitors a year. A natural location with historic significance and spectacular views, The Cliffs of Moher are not to be missed.
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The Abbey was founded in 1195 by Donal Mór Ua Briain (Donald O’Brien). Construction used local limestone and legend maintains that the building was commissioned by King Conor na Siudane Ua Briain. He died in 1267 and his tomb effigy is visible in the north wall of the choir. According to the legend, Ua Briain executed the five stonemasons who completed the abbey to prevent them from constructing a rival masterpiece elsewhere. In reality, it was probably built by Conor's grandfather, Donal Mór Ua Briain (Donald O'Brien), the patron of a number of other religious structures in the historic Thomond region. The English Reformation led to the dissolution of Catholic monasteries in England and Ireland. In 1554, the abbey was granted to the Earl of Thomond. The monks continued to tend the fields and maintain the abbey as circumstances allowed, but the political climate led to continual decline. The last Abbot, Reverend John O'Dea, was named in 1628. Today the abbey is a tourist attraction with detailed carvings and arches which are still intact.
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The castle was built by the Hynes clan around 1520, a family who may have been associated with the area since around 662. At the time, the royal palace of Guaire Aidne mac Colmáin, the legendary king of Connacht is believed to have been in this area. According to current thinking by archaeologists, the original dun was most likely a ring fort, the remains of which can be found on the small promontory just to the northeast of the current castle. Dunguaire Castle was transferred in the 17th century to Oliver Martin (father of Richard Martin fitz Oliver). Richard Martin (or Martyn) lived here until 1642. Dunguaire Castle remained in his family. However, their main seat was Tullira (or Tulira) Castle near Gort and Dunguaire fell into disrepair. In 1924, the surgeon and poet Oliver St. John Gogarty purchased Dunguaire Castle. Gogarty began restoring the castle and established it as the meeting place for the leading figures of the Celtic Revival, such as W.B. Yeats, George Bernard Shaw, Augusta, Lady Gregory, and John Millington Synge. The castle was acquired in 1954 by Christobel Lady Ampthill, who completed the restoration work started by Gogarty. It was later purchased by Shannon Development, an Irish corporation that manages numerous historic tourist attractions in Ireland. During the summer months when Dunguaire Castle is open to the public, a Medieval Banquet is held every night with costumed performers who recite Irish literature and play traditional Irish music.
 

Cliffs of Moher Tour from Dublin : Attractions

We have taken great care and consideration when compiling our tours to visit the best attractions in Ireland and to give our customers the best experience possible. Our itineraries are planned to give you the best opportunity to explore the west coast of Ireland and all it has to offer. The cliffs of Moher tour from Dublin main attraction is  the Cliffs of Moher which are 214 meters at their highest point and stretch for 8km along the  Wild Atlantic Way coastline. You also explore a small section of the Burren, a karst landscape which despite its barren appearance  is surprisingly very fertile and  home to three quarters of Ireland’s species of flowers. It is a unique location with Arctic mediterranean and Alpine Plants growing side by side. You get stunning photo stops along the way and learn about the history of Dunguaire Castle near Galway Bay. Another highlight of the Cliffs of Moher Tour is our visit to Corcomroe Abbey, a 12th century abbey which has many carved decorative stones, a graveyard and the tomb of Conor Na Siudane Ua Briain. It was said that the stone masons were executed on completion of the structure so that its construction could not be rivaled. Other attractions include Doolin village, Fanore Beach and Galway Bay. The Cliffs of Moher  tour From Dublin is packed with stunning scenery and attractions and is sure to satisfy any traveller!