The Cliffs of Moher

The Cliffs of Moher.

The Cliffs of Moher didn’t receive over 1.4 million visitors last year for no good reason. Towering at 702 feet at their highest point the sight of these cliffs is guaranteed to make your jaw drop every time & knees wobble if you get too close to the edge. Nothing will make you feel smaller than standing on top and staring out into the vast Atlantic Ocean. On a clear day you can see the Aran Islands off the coast of Galway Bay, some also like to joke that you can nearly see the Statue of Liberty. The cliffs stretch for 8km as the crow flies and they are Ireland’s most popular natural attraction. They are Ireland at its most rugged, natural and breath-taking & provide a photo opportunity like no other.

                       

 

A visitors centre provides all the amenities needed to make your visit a pleasant one and it has been built into the hillside to ensure that no intrusive man-made buildings spoil the rugged atmosphere. The centre features an interactive media display covering the geology of the area, a cinema experience displaying a bird’s-eye view of the cliffs as well as a range of craft gifts from local producers in the region. Come rain or shine the cliffs are equally impressive, on clear days you can see for miles & on rainy days the echo of the waves is even louder as they smash off the cliffs. Many birds make the cliffs their home including the only mainland colony of breeding Atlantic Puffins in Ireland. In fact the cliffs are one of the only places in Europe where the population of these Puffins is increasing and not decreasing so clearly even birds aren’t immune to the Cliff’s beauty.

 

                       

 

If the views from the ground weren’t already impressive enough you can scale O’Brien’s tower to see even further. The tower was built in 1835 as an observation tower for the Victorian tourists that visited the cliffs at the time & over 150 years later it is still used for that purpose. In the 1970s the tower was restored to its former glory and now provides views as far as the mountains in Kerry on a clear day. Another alternative way to view the cliffs is from a boat cruise. This allows you to see the cliffs rising above you and see the visitors on top appear as small as ants. The cliffs sit on a walking trail that 20km and includes a stop in the traditional music capital of Ireland, Doolin. This colourful village is within easy reach of the Cliffs and provides plenty of song, craic and amazing food so be sure to check it out!